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14th February 2019 Jess Shanahan

Eating out in Norfolk

Spectacular seafood

Eating out Norfolk

Enjoy locally-sourced fresh seafood at Rocky Bottoms

North Norfolk is a great place for fine food. The sea and coast deliver delicious seafood and fish but you won’t be stuck for choice when it comes to meat, game and fantastic vegetarian dishes to go with it.

Rocky Bottoms is an excellent example of local food worked into an interesting menu. Crab and lobster are caught just off the coast in the restaurant’s own boat named the Anna Gail. The menu changes regularly to reflect the season and availability of the shellfish so you’ll always get the freshest local food possible. The views from the restaurant are amazing and, if the weather’s right, you can pick up something from the seafood counter to take down to the beach with a coffee.

The Hoste in Burnham Market is also famous for its delicious local food, much of which is sourced from within a 30-mile radius. The menus are innovative and show off the best of British cuisine. The Hoste will also please wine connoisseurs thanks to its extensive drinks list featuring vintage wines from some of the finest estates around the world. The Victoria Inn is ideally situated just a few minutes’ walk from the golden sands of Holkham Beach and at the gates of Holkham Hall. It focuses on fresh, local and seasonal food.

If you’re looking for somewhere to stay as well as eat, The Grove in Cromer is a guest house with a menu that shows off local, seasonal flavours. The staff are welcoming and the house is a delight to spend time in throughout the year. Dogs are welcome in the on-site cottages, too, just in case you’re planning a trip to the coast with a canine friend. Bacton is a small village but it’s home to the Sugar and Spice cafe where you’ll find delicious food. The Hummingbird Cake comes highly recommended but there’s a large menu of hearty food to choose from, too.

For something a little lighter, head down to Mundesley and The Corner House Café where you can get jacket potatoes, salads and sandwiches at great prices. The whole cafe is beautifully set out and there’s even a little shop so you can browse through some local, hand-made wares while you wait for your food. If you’re hungry, The Royal pub has a large menu and generous portions. If you’re around on a Sunday, you’d be silly to miss the carvery, which attracts people from all over the area. This traditional pub has a lot of old-world charm but modern additions to the building – including a bright coffee lounge and outside terrace – bring it right up-to-date.

Rocky Bottoms is an excellent example of local food worked into an interesting menu. Crab and lobster are caught just off the coast in the restaurant’s own boat named the Anna Gail

Modern menus

Eating out Norfolk

Enjoy a plethora of delicious and modern dishes on your trip

A little way round the coast is Sheringham and it’s here you’ll find a really eye-catching restaurant in an unusual setting. The Bank is a Nepalese restaurant set in, you guessed it, an old bank. The dining experience is unlike anything else in Norfolk with beautifully-presented curries, rice, naan and vegetable dishes available. If you fancy a bit of a splurge, Michelin-starred Morston Hall offers a fantastic champagne afternoon tea which will leave you feeling stuffed. You’ll be treated to a glass of fizz, scones, cake, sandwiches and other little delights cooked up by the kitchen. You’ll also get to choose from the vast range of teas.

Head west and visit King’s Lynn for modern European fare at Marriott’s Warehouse. The setting of this restaurant is just as spectacular as its food. You can soak up the sun on the quayside or head inside to drink in the atmosphere of the 16th-century warehouse. A 10-minute walk from King’s Lynn’s town centre, you’ll find the Bank House Hotel, a Georgian townhouse serving modern brasserie food. Like many places in Norfolk, the restaurant takes full advantage of the local produce on offer.

Set deep in the Norfolk countryside, Congham Hall is a beautiful Georgian hotel and spa which is well known for its delicious food. Take your pick from a menu full of locally-sourced ingredients, many of which are grown in the hotel’s own kitchen garden. While you’re there why not treat yourself to a spa treatment, too? If you’re in the area and fancy a spot of tea, stop off at The Teapot in Swaffham to recharge your batteries as you explore this beautiful part of Norfolk.

In Norwich there’s Grosvenor Fish Bar, which has a deal with The Birdcage pub opposite – you can take your fish and chips to the pub so you can enjoy them with a pint, or glass of prosecco. If you fancy something a little different, Moorish Falafel makes for a great lunch stop when you’re shopping in the city. It’s tucked away on Lower Goat Lane in Norwich’s famous Lanes area and serves up home-made falafel in a pitta with your choice of extras.

Head west and visit King’s Lynn for modern European fare at Marriott’s Warehouse. The setting of this restaurant is just as spectacular as its food. You can soak up the sun on the quayside or head inside to drink in the atmosphere of the 16th-century warehouse

Sweet treats and plant-based eats

Eating out Norfolk

Norfolk has a good range of restaurants for those who prefer a plant-based diet

For an interesting take on a British staple, visit Mother Chip at the Fat Cat Brewery Tap. This regular pop-up features delicious chips with all sorts of toppings including Dr Pepper pulled pork, chicken, and sundried tomatoes. And don’t forget that other British seaside staple – ice cream! The Parravani story started in 1898 when 15-year-old Giuseppe Parravani, armed with little more than his brother’s name and the word “Norwich” scrawled on a piece of paper, left the poor farmlands of Italy and travelled across mainland Europe to Norfolk. Reunited with brother Domenico, the teenager worked in his sibling’s ice cream business on Ber Street, before starting his own venture from a horse and cart in Bungay. Now the company relies on a handful of stainless steel machines and a fleet of ice cream vans to sell their 30 flavours throughout Norfolk and Suffolk.

If you’re after plant-based food, you’re spoilt for choice in our city. The newest addition to Tombland, Erpingham House, is a vision of pastel colours and silk flowers making it an Instagram dream. The menu is innovative and completely plant-based meaning it’s suitable for all preferences and dietary requirements. If you’re after a quick stop for lunch, head to the brand new Café Pure on St George’s Street. The coffee is fantastic, the service quick and there’s a wide range of cakes and sandwiches to fuel you for a day of shopping.

For dinner time, head to Yellows, owned by famous local chef and Norwich City Football Club shareholder Delia Smith. It’s situated within Carrow Road stadium and is the perfect chance to get up close to some of Norfolk’s sporting heritage. For the adventurous among us, every October the city celebrates the art of mixology with Norwich Cocktail Week. Whether you prefer the classics or fancy something a little unusual, visit various bars across Norwich and indulge. A wristband will get you all sorts of discounts and offers throughout the week, making this the most affordable way to try a variety of different venues and drinks.

If it’s food and drink with a view you’re looking for, head to Rose Lane and the Union Building. Situated on the top floor is The Rooftop Gardens, a restaurant and bar with impressive 360-degree views of Norwich. The food is local with a contemporary twist and the cocktail menu features a wonderful coffee old fashioned. If you’re looking for a real experience when it comes to your food, visit B’nou on St Benedict’s Street. Everyone arrives at a similar time and stays throughout the evening. There’s no menu, instead tapas plates are brought around and you choose what you want during your time there. This is a really interesting way to dine, but if you want to try this very unique food experience you need to book in advance.

The Parravani story started in 1898 when 15-year-old Giuseppe Parravani, armed with little more than his brother’s name and the word “Norwich” scrawled on a piece of paper, left the poor farmlands of Italy and travelled across mainland Europe to Norfolk

Fine dining

Eating out Norfolk

Indulge in a meal at one of Norfolk’s fine dining restaurants

For wine lovers, there’s The Wine Cellar, a delightful little restaurant with a sunny courtyard that’s tucked away down an alley off Gaol Hill in the city centre. The wine list is extensive and the experienced staff can give recommendations based on your tastes and what you’re eating.

Just four miles outside of Norwich in Framingham Pigot is Brasted’s, an award-winning restaurant that’s known throughout the county for its locally-sourced menu which changes regularly (usually every six to eight weeks). The food is British with a decidedly European twist which allows for a bit of flair in this fine dining restaurant.

The Wildebeest in Stoke Holy Cross is another delight that will please even the most discerning of diners. The food is local, well thought out and not too over-the-top. If you want good food that doesn’t try too hard, this is the place. On the east coast of the county you’ll find Gorleston-on-Sea and The Shed, which you can’t miss right next to the old lighthouse. This relaxed dining experience offers a welcoming atmosphere whether you’re there for the £20 pre-theatre dinner menu or just fancy trying the famous Norfolk mussels.

If you’re in Great Yarmouth and don’t fancy seafront fish and chips followed by doughnuts, consider Chico’s on Marine Parade. The menu features freshly-caught shellfish, a wide range of seafood and plenty of steak, too.

Norfolk is about so much more than its great cafes and restaurants. The county is home to some amazing local food producers, too. Keep an eye out for Bray’s Cottage Pork Pies, which you can find in shops and cafes throughout Norfolk. These pies are made from local pork and take the traditional snack a step further with added ingredients such as chorizo, onion marmalade and lemon. Of course, you can get a classic version as well.

Just four miles outside of Norwich in Framingham Pigot is Brasted’s, an award-winning restaurant that’s known throughout the county for its locally-sourced menu which changes regularly 

Farm shops and foodie delights

Eating out Norfolk

There’s plenty of local ingredients and foodie hotspots to try on your trip here!

If you’re looking for foodie goodies to take home, seek out the pickles and vinegars from Scrubby Oak Fine Foods. The raspberry vinegar is particularly good when paired with ice cream or yoghurt – yes really! Another local great is Marsh Pig. These cured meats can be found on charcuterie boards around Norfolk and you can also pick up packs in farm shops across the county. The farm shops and delis around Norfolk are something to behold.

There’s the all-singing, all-dancing farm shops such as Back to the Garden in Letheringsett – which includes an on-site restaurant as well as all the local meat, vegetables and store cupboard goods you’d expect – and there are also little delis such as Wells Deli in Wells-next-the-Sea, a more humble affair but not without plenty of delicious food on offer.

This is the perfect place to visit if you want to grab some goodies ahead of a picnic on the beach. If you appreciate good beer then a trip – or four – to Norwich’s Fat Cat pubs should be on your list of things to do while in Norfolk. There’s the original Fat Cat on West End Street, the Fat Cat Tap where the beer is brewed on Lawson Road, the Fat Cat and Canary on Thorpe Road, not far from Riverside and the train station, and the new Fat Percy on Adelaide Street. Each of the pubs offers a range of Fat Cat beers as well as other British ales, beers and ciders. There’s also a great international selection of drinks, too, making these pubs the place to be if you want to try something new.

If you fancy a pint over Sunday lunch head to The Georgian Town House in Norwich’s Golden Triangle. The menu is very varied with so much to choose from. Vegetarians are well catered for here, but you won’t be disappointed by tasty roast meats, seasonal vegetables and interesting vegetarian options. This restaurant has bags of style but it’s not lacking in substance either.

Norfolk hosts all sorts of beer festivals throughout the year, the largest taking place in The Halls in St Andrew’s in October. Brewers from Norfolk and beyond gather in this stunning building, giving you the chance to sample a wide range of beers in a relaxed atmosphere. The festival goes on for a week and if you fancy a quiet tasting session, go during the day. For those who fancy a bit more of a party, get yourself a ticket for Saturday night.


Everything you need to know about Norfolk

The best things to do in Norfolk

The best shopping in Norfolk

The best nightlife in Norfolk

Your guide to arts and culture in Norfolk

Image credits: ©Brooke Lark/Paula Vermeulen/Toa Heftiba/Unsplash; Gonzos; Paul Bailey/Rocky Bottoms

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