Sign up to our newsletter for the latest UK and Ireland travel and destination stories

How to spend 48 hours in Brighton and Hove

By Kingfisher Visitor Guides

You will be surprised how much you can pack into 48 hours in Brighton and Hove. Take some inspiration from our weekend guide.


Day one

Brighton is compact enough to walk around, and it’s the perfect way to soak up the city’s unique atmosphere. Start your tour with a bit of history at the Royal Pavilion. Built as a pleasure palace for the Prince Regent in the 18th century, it’s the perfect place to kick-start 48 hours of fun. 

From here you can stroll across the gardens to the Brighton Museum & Art Gallery, home to an eclectic mix of temporary exhibits and events. 

Sightseeing is thirsty work, so head to North Laine, which has more coffee shops than you can shake a spoon at. It’s also the epicentre of Brighton’s bohemia, with a wide range of independent shops selling everything from kitchenware to underwear and fashion to furniture.

Start your tour of the region with a bit of history at the Royal Pavilion

Start your tour of the region with a bit of history at the Royal Pavilion

North Laine is not to be confused with Brighton’s Lanes, another fabulous place for shopping. The Lanes was once the heart of the old fishing town, and is a maze of cobbled alleyways with yet more shops and cafes. Pick any of these for lunch and you won’t be disappointed, but for the best fish and chips in town head to Bankers on Western Road. From there it’s a five-minute walk to the beach, so don’t forget to pack your cossie. 

After you’ve washed off the sea salt back at your hotel, it’s time for a cocktail. The historic Grand Brighton has received a multi-million pound refurbishment and its Victoria Bar is the ultimate in opulence. Expect show stopping cocktails and free nibbles.

Save space for dinner, as Brighton has some of the UK’s best restaurants, with flavours from all around the world. For a real culinary treat book a table at 64 Degrees. This tiny restaurant serves up big flavours, with British food in a tapas style. 

If you’ve got any energy left see a gig at the Komedia, or for something a bit more relaxing take in a film. Its cinema offers intimate viewing on plush, comfy seats and sofas.

The Lanes was once the heart of the old fishing town, and is a maze of cobbled alleyways with yet more shops and cafes

Day two

Clear your head from the night before by taking a walk along the esplanade, from Hove Lawns to the Pier. There is plenty to look at on the way, with Regency architecture at its finest, and the hustle and bustle of Brightonians, all enjoying the sea air. 

For the best views visit the British Airways i360. The viewing pod glides up to 138m, making it the world’s tallest moving observation tower.

If heights aren’t your thing, nose around the shops in the refurbished West Pier arches. Also worth a browse are the Artist’s Quarters by the Pier. Formerly fisherman’s arches, they now contain studios where local artists sell their work direct to the public.

Next stop Brighton Palace Pier, one of the most popular visitor destinations in the UK. It offers all the best in family seaside entertainment, but don’t stay long or you’ll spend your dinner money. 

Thrill-seekers should head for the Turbo Coaster at Brighton Palace Pier

Thrill-seekers should head for the Turbo Coaster at Brighton Palace Pier

Kemptown is the perfect spot for lunch – often referred to as the ‘gay village’ due to the high number of LGBTQ+ people that live there. By day, it certainly has a village feel to it, with cute book stores, vintage furniture shops and delis offering local delights. The family-friendly Busby and Wilds has a fantastic menu that includes top-notch roasts on a Sunday – and amazing puddings. By night Kemptown turns into a party town, so you might decide to let your lunch turn into cocktails and clubbing. 

For something a little more wholesome, jump on a number 77 bus to Devil’s Dyke. Part of the South Downs National Trust, it offers amazing views over the Weald and across the English Channel.

You’ve sampled the local countryside, now it’s time to sample the local craft beer. The Evening Star was where the Dark Star Brewery Company started in 1994 and offers an incredible range of bottled beer and cask ales. If you prefer your grape to your grain visit Ten Green Bottles, where you can enjoy Sussex’s very best wines and champagne.

For your last supper stick to the local theme at Riddle & Finns on the beach, for a seafood feast, caught right here in Sussex.

Read more about Brighton and Hove

Share this...
Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter

Image credits: ©British Airways i360; Charlotte Coneybeer/Unsplash; Royal Pavilion & Museums, Brighton & Hove

Related features

×